Celebrating plywood

On July 20, 2017 · 0 Comments

Alvar Aalto's Paimio chair, on display at the V&A's plywood exhibitionCurrently showing at the V&A, ‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’ celebrates the incredibly diverse applications of an often overlooked material.

The exhibition explores how plywood has been used to design and construct objects large and small, from architecture and aeroplanes to skateboards and sewing machine covers.

plywood-blog-1

Unsurprisingly, the use of plywood in furniture design forms a significant portion of the show.

An enviable array of chairs, tables and stools are on display, from icons of twentieth-century design to lesser-known but no less fascinating pieces.

Objects from the exhibtion 'Plywood: Material of the Modern World' at the V&A

Inspired by the show, we have compiled our own tribute to plywood, selecting our favourite designs formed using this remarkable material.

Ranging in scale from furniture to homewares, twentytwentyone’s pick of plywood pieces includes modernist icons such as the Paimio chair by Alvar Aalto and Marcel Breuer‘s Short chair (both of which appear in the V&A exhibition)…

Alvar Aalto, Paimio chairMarcel Breuer, Short chair… to mid-century classics by Charles and Ray Eames and Norman Cherner.

LCW calfskin chair by Charles and Ray EamesCherner armchair by Norman ChernerContemporary designers including Jasper Morrison and Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec continue to explore the potential of plywood…

Hal ply tube chair by Jasper Morrison for VitraBelleville chair by Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra… and we couldn’t neglect designs at a slightly smaller scale, such as the Tricorne tray by Robin Day.

Tricorne tray by Robin Day‘Plywood: Material of the Modern World’ is on at the V&A until November, but you can enjoy our own plywood edit from the comfort of your own home.

Day for Flowers exhibition

On June 29, 2017 · 0 Comments

Day for Flowers exhibition at River StreetIn celebration of Lucienne Day‘s centenary year, the Day for Flowers exhibition opened at twentytwentyone’s River Street showroom on 20th June.

Day for Flowers exhibitionDay for Flowers exhibitionThe exhibition was conceived as a tribute to one of Britain’s most significant and influential textile designers. It also marked the launch of the Lucienne Day Flower Brick.

Lucienne Day centenary edition Flower BrickA limited, numbered edition of Lucienne Day’s 1960s flower brick design has been produced by twentytwentyone to mark Day’s centenary.

Day for Flowers saw a range of creative individuals from the design world present their own tribute to Lucienne Day by using her Flower Brick design to create a unique floral arrangement.

Day for Flowers exhibition The participating designers were Barber & Osgerby, Paula Day, Max Fraser, Suzy Hoodless, Margaret Howell, Philippe Malouin, Alex Mowatt, Nikki Tibbles and Faye Toogood working with Yasuyo Harvey.

The arrangements produced were remarkable for their diversity of form and the variety of flowers and foliage used. Crisply architectural formations stood side by side with abundant displays of colour, texture and shape.

Barber & Osgerby Paula Day Flower Brick arrangementsAbove left: Barber & Osgerby. Above right: Paula Day.

fraser-hoodlessAbove left: Max Fraser. Above right: Suzy Hoodless.

howell-malouinAbove left: Margaret Howell. Above right: Philippe Malouin.

mowat-tibblesAbove right: Alex Mowat. Above left: Nikki Tibbles.

toogood-harveyAbove: Faye Toogood and Yasuyo Harvey.

Paula Day’s arrangement had a particularly personal resonance. Her blooms included cuttings from her mother’s favourite ‘New Dawn’ rose, taken from a plant grown by Lucienne Day but now transplanted to her daughter’s garden.

Day for Flowers exhibition Day for Flowers exhibition openingThe wide variety of effects achieved illustrated the inherent flexibility of this elegantly functional design…

exhib-17Day for Flowers exhibition opening… and of course served as a most fitting tribute to a designer whose enduring works continue to inspire.

Day for Flowers exhibition openingDay for Flowers was on display at our River Street showroom from  21st to 24th June 2017.

If you’ve been inspired by the flower displays above you can purchase your own Flower Brick here.

Day for Flowers exhibition

On May 4, 2017 · 0 Comments

Day for Flowers exhibition

In Lucienne Day‘s centenary year, twentytwentyone is celebrating her contributions to design with Day for Flowers, a collaborative exhibition that also marks the relaunch of one of Lucienne Day’s designs: the Flower Brick.

Flowers and plants were a key source of inspiration in Lucienne Day’s life and work. She was a passionate gardener and abstracted plant and flower forms appear throughout her work.

Lucienne Day

The flower brick has its origins in the decorative Delftware produced during the 18th century to hold ornate floral displays. In 1966 Lucienne Day reinterpreted this historic genre in a collection of distinctive contemporary designs that were produced in England by Bristol Potteries.

twentytwentyone has collaborated with 1882 Ltd and the Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation to bring the Lucienne Day Flower Brick back into production, with a celebratory limited edition of 100.

Lucienne Day Flower Bricks

To mark the reissue of Day’s design we have invited ten creative individuals from the worlds of fashion, design, interiors, architecture and journalism to design a floral display using a Flower Brick.

Designers and creatives taking part in Day for Flowers exhibition

We are delighted to have the participation of Michael AnastassiadesBarber & OsgerbyPaula DayMax FraserSuzy HoodlessMargaret HowellPhilippe MalouinAlex MowatNikki Tibbles and Faye Toogood.

The ten arrangements they design will be displayed at our River Street showroom, providing a dramatic and inspiring summer show of floral creations – and a fitting tribute to Lucienne Day.

Day for Flowers is hosted in association with 1882 Ltd and The Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation.

It will run from Wednesday 21st to Saturday 24th June.

Lucienne Day centenary

On January 6, 2017 · 0 Comments

Lucienne Day

Born on 5th January 1917, Lucienne Day was Britain’s most distinguished textile designer of the 20th century, esteemed for her acute understanding of pattern, colour and scale and her significant role in popularising modern design in Great Britain from the 1940s onwards.

The Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation has organised a programme of events and exhibitions to mark the centenary of such a prolific, progressive and influential designer, launched on what would have been Lucienne’s 100th birthday.

Lucienne_Day_100_GIFThe centenary is also commemorated with the poster Lucienne Day 100 Designs. Designed by Studio Fernando Gutierrez, the poster forms a companion piece to Robin Day 100 Designs, similarly issued to mark the centenary of Lucienne Day’s husband and fellow designer.

Lucienne Day 100 Designs poster

The new poster features previously unpublished images of Lucienne Day’s work as well as portraits from the Foundation’s Lucienne Day photograph archive, providing a fitting tribute to one of Britain’s foremost designers.

It is a testament to the enduring nature of Lucienne Day’s designs that many remain in production, more than half a century after their inception.

In 2003 a selection of Day’s printed textiles from the 1950s were reissued by Classic Textiles, including perhaps her most well-known design, Calyx.

Calyx fabric designed by Lucienne Day

Originally designed for Heals in 1951, Calyx was exhibited at the Festival of Great Britain Homes and Gardens Pavilion, hanging in a modern dining room setting designed by Robin Day.

It went on to win the Milan Triennale gold medal and the American Institute of Decorator’s international design award (the latter a first for any British designer).

Lucienne Day OBE, 1917-2010In the present day, digital printing techniques ensure that Calyx and its companion fabrics remain faithful both to the integrity of the original designs and to Day’s longstanding conviction that good design should be available to all.

As the designer observed, ”I went into industrial design because I wanted people to have good things at a reasonable price.”

twentytwentyone hosted the exhibition Lucienne Day Classic Textiles in 2003 to celebrate the launch of the reissued textiles collection.

Lucienne Day Classic Textiles exhibition at twentytwentyone, 2003

On a smaller scale – but no less appealing, are Lucienne Day’s tea towels. These witty and timeless designs printed on linen were first created in the late 1950s for  Thomas Somerset.

Lucienne Day tea towels

Now reissued and perennially popular, they are just as likely to end up framed and hung on a wall as put to work in the kitchen.

Lucienne Day Black Leaf tea towel

twentytwentyone is honoured to participate in the celebration of a designer whose work was profoundly influential in its own time while continuing to delight and inspire in the present day.

Full details of the events planned over the year can be found here.

All archive images are courtesy of the Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation.

‘Gerd Hay-Edie: Evolutionary Weaver’ at Margaret Howell

On October 14, 2016 · 0 Comments

Robin Day Centenary Edition Reclining Chair on display as part of the exhibition 'Gerd Hay-Edie: Evolutionary Weaver' at Margaret Howell

A Robin Day Centenary Edition Reclining Chair loaned by twentytwentyone is currently on display at Margaret Howell’s Wigmore Street shop.

Upholstered in a classic tweed woven by Mourne Textiles and designed by Gerd Hay-Edie in the 1950s, the chair forms part of the exhibition ‘Gerd Hay-Edie: Evolutionary Weaver’ which opened with a private view on 12th October.

Gerd Hay-Edie
Norwegian-born Gerd Hay-Edie (1909-1997) was an influential textile designer whose fabrics were championed by design luminaries such as Robin Day, Hille, Conran and Liberty.

After settling in Ireland in the 1950s, Hay-Edie founded a hand-weaving workshop after failing to find a suitable means of production for the textiles she was designing at the time.

Today, Mourne Textiles – now run by Hay-Edie’s grandson – works to ensure her classic mid-century designs remain in production while staying entirely faithful to the unique spirit of Hay-Edie’s originals.

Mourne Textiles' workshop in Ireland

Hay-Edie produced several textile designs for specifically for Robin Day, and her Blazer Mourne tweed was used to cover a High, Wide and Handsome chair in the Days’ own home.

It was particularly apposite, therefore, that this was the fabric chosen by Margaret Howell when she was invited to upholster a Robin Day Reclining Chair as part of twentytwentyone’s celebration of Robin Day’s Centenary.

Robin Day Centenary Edition Reclining Chair

Celebrating the vision and expertise of two significant forces in mid-century British design, the Margaret Howell Centenary Edition Reclining Chair takes its place in the exhibition alongside other other examples of Hay-Edie’s work and a loom from Mourne Textile’s studio.

Robin Day Centenary Edition Reclining chair in situ(Photo courtesy of: Robin and Lucienne Day Foundation)

The exhibition is on display at Margaret Howell, 34 Wigmore Street, until Sunday 30th October.

View the Robin Day Centenary Edition Reclining Chair here.

Marker, plus twenty

On September 21, 2016 · 0 Comments

'Marker, plus twenty' exhibition

‘Marker, plus twenty’, an exhibition curated by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby, opened last night at twentytwentyone’s River Street showroom.

'Marker, plus twenty' private view

'Marker, plus twenty' private view

On show for the duration of the London Design Festival, ‘Marker, plus twenty’ celebrates the launch of Marker, the new addition to Barber & Osgerby’s family of Hotaru paper lanterns.

The exhibition also references twentytwentyone’s 20th anniversary and celebrates the long-standing collaboration between the two companies.

Marker Hotaru paper lanterns

'Marker, plus twenty' exhibition

This highly personal display consists of twenty objects selected from Edward and Jay’s personal collection of curiosities from around the world, accumulated over many years. “There are,” the designers note, “quite a few gaps on our shelves at the moment.”

The objects on display include both furniture and product design and more humble every day objects, ranging from a Thonet chair to a Japanese glass fishing net float.

'Marker, plus twenty' exhibition

Objects in the 'Marker, plus twenty' exhibition

Accumulated over many years, these items have been selected for their form, material or craftsmanship. Although strikingly diverse in scale, function, value and age, each object has been an inspiration in some way or other.

Together they offer an intriguing insight into the influences and interests of one of Britain’s foremost design duos.

'Marker plus twenty' private view

Edward Barber talks Jasper Morrison through the exhibition

‘Marker, plus twenty’ will be on display at our River Street showroom, 9.30am to 5.30pm, until Sunday 25th September.

'Marker, plus twenty' exhibition

Marker Hotaru paper lantern

twentytwentyone is 20: 20 exhibitions

On September 9, 2016 · 0 Comments

twentytwentyone's exhibition of Wrong Shop prints by Erwan and Ronan Bouroullec

The latest instalment in our twentieth anniversary editorials celebrates the rich collaborative chemistry that we have been fortunate to share with many designers, manufacturers and individuals by presenting 20 exhibitions we have hosted over the past two decades.

Exhibitions have been an important aspect of twentytwentyone from the outset, and the programme of events conceived, curated and hosted includes progressive design launches, historical reviews and one-off charitable endeavours.

The designers we have celebrated in the process range from Charles and Ray Eames and Robin and Lucienne Day to Jasper Morrison and Naoto Fukasawa, while the works on display have included both rare vintage pieces and newly minted designs fresh from the Milan Salone.

You can view September’s edit in full here, and gain an overview of twentytwentyone’s exhibitions here.

Find out more about our twentieth anniversary and view all twentytwentyone is 20 editorials to date here.

Marker, plus twenty at the London Design Festival

On September 8, 2016 · 0 Comments

Marker by Barber & Osgerby

Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby’s new design, Marker, will be launched at the 2016 London Design Festival in the context of an exhibition curated by the designers.

The highly personal exhibition offers an intriguing insight into Barber & Osgerby‘s influences and inspirations through a collection of 20 objects ranging in scale, origin, age and function. At the same time it references twentytwentyone’s 20th anniversary and celebrates the long-standing collaboration between the two companies.

Marker is the third design in the Hotaru family of paper lanterns, handmade in Japan by Ozeki, renowned manufacturers of traditional washi paper lanterns.

Hotaru lights are hand crafted in Japan

Marker continues the designers’ exploration of pure sculptural forms and complements the sizes available in Buoy and Double Bubble, the two Hotaru designs launched at LDF 2015.

Marker, plus twenty will be on display at our River Street showroom until Sunday 25th September.

Double Bubble and Buoy Hotaru pendant lights

twentytwentyone London Design Festival newsletter

On September 7, 2016 · 0 Comments

Wallace Sewell's new collection for twentytwentyone

twentytwentyone’s September newsletter is here, with news of the designs which are to be launched as part of this year’s London Design Festival.

Also included are details of our latest online edit marking our 20th anniversary. This month we have compiled a list of 20 exhibitions hosted over the past two decades, from design launches and historical reviews to charity events.

Sign up for future newsletters here.

twentytwentyone is 20: enduring classics

On May 13, 2016 · 0 Comments

the Superleggera chair by Gio Ponti, one our selection of enduring classics now on display at our Upper Street shop

The latest instalment in our twentytwentyone is 20 series of editorials presents our selection of 20 enduring furniture classics.

Licensed historical designs have been a constant at twentytwentyone since its foundation in 1996, and our most recent edit reveals the designs that we believe have the core ingredients to ensure longevity.

Currently on display at twentytwentyone’s Upper Street shop, the selection includes classic tables, seating and storage that range from pioneering examples of 1930s modernism to definitive designs of the 1970s. The pieces on display include signature works by design luminaries such as Alvar Aalto, Charles and Ray Eames, Charlotte Perriand, Gio Ponti and Hans J Wegner.

View all twentytwentyone is 20 editorials to date here.

News archive
News categories
Subscribe to our newsletter
Follow us
Follow twentytwentyone on Facebook | Follow twentytwentyone on Twitter