Social Togetherness: Spandana Gopal in Conversation

On May 30, 2020 · 0 Comments

twentytwentyone are honoured to work with wonderfully creative designers, makers and manufacturers and today we are talking to Spandana Gopal founder of Tiipoi, a design studio based between Bangalore and London.

Where’s home for you?

Currently NW8, but moving to Lower Clapton soon.

What are the highlights of your home-working day?

Food has been a highlight and we’ve been eating and experimenting with different ingredients (wild garlic at the moment), usually a glass of wine with lunch after a mat-based workout!

My ‘workday’ usually starts at about 14:00 these days till about 18:00. I keep staring at my literally unsolvable puzzle of white rice (also on the dining table taking up a lot of space) Take breaks to read books that I haven’t read – lots of design history books. The evenings have unfortunately been consumed by Netflix – Breaking Bad and Better Call Saul (which is excellent).

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal pace?

I knitted some slippers and I tried to make objects out of vegetable pulp – that didn’t go too well.

Are you learning a new skill, craft or hobby? 

Refreshed my knitting skills. playing some songs on the piano – I learnt a song by Rhianna last week.

What positive change might come from Covid-19?

The end of capitalism. We will go back to growing vegetables, trading clothes and goods, not travelling by air, but opening borders in new ways – maybe camper vans will be a thing of the future!

Any interesting projects, exhibitions or launches for later this year?

Not sure yet, but we think we will continue developing products and working with interesting materials – maybe thinking up a new type of event where we can engage with our audiences through entirely new ways? 

Given time to reflect, what would be your wish for a new piece of furniture or lighting?

More like a portable food truck-come-shop which we could drive around London. Moving architecture for nice objects, food and people.

Many thanks to Spandana for taking the time to talk to us.

 

 

Social Togetherness: Katherine Hoeger in Conversation

On May 23, 2020 · 0 Comments

twentytwentyone are honoured to work with wonderfully creative designers, makers and manufacturers and today we are talking to Katherine Hoeger of Nine United.

Where’s home for you?

The answer to that question should be perfectly straight forward but is a little complicated for me to answer at the moment. I have been moving around with work focusing on different markets, but ultimately I feel at home where my family & friends and my work & colleagues are, which is predominantly in London, Berlin and Hamburg. 

During the lockdown period, I am in Berlin, working from our dining table here with a perfect view of the Wrongshop print by Ronan Bouroullec, that I first saw at the twentytwentyone launch in River Street a few years ago, and am really enjoying every day at the moment.

What are the highlights of your home-working day?

After a few weeks in quarantine in our flat, the highlight of the day is a lovely walk along the river with my husband at the end of the day. To have those longer days of sunshine is a treat every year in Spring, but feels extremely special right now. Admittedly a glass of wine afterwards on the doorstep has become a much-valued ritual as well.

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal pace?

I’ve always enjoyed putting together fresh flowers for our flat, but admittedly I am indulging in that a lot more than usual at the moment. Both because I get to enjoy them much more, but also to support a flower shop run by a great Japanese and Dutch duo in the neighbourhood, who have just reopened and are inspiring me to go increasingly overboard with arrangements considering they’re in a domestic setting without guests.

I’ve started to draw some of the flowers, which is quite therapeutic and makes you appreciate them even more. It’ll probably end up a small series of sketches and drawings of those lockdown blooms. 

Are you learning a new skill, craft or hobby?

I’d say it’s mainly the drawing although I am definitely in need of a little more practice (and patience) to get back into it properly and be satisfied with the outcome.

I don’t think it quite counts as a new skill or hobby just yet, but I’ve gone rowing a couple of times and discovered it as a great form of exercise in times of social distancing. 

What positive change might come from Covid-19 for you, or your wider community, or the world at large?

Though I miss seeing a lot of people and places, it has also had positives to stay in one place for a little while. It’s good for focus and concentration and inspiring in a different way than the usual fast-pace. There is also a lot of community spirit and thoughtful acts of kindness among neighbours, and a greater appreciation for things that might have been taken for granted before. As for the world at large, in our company culture where we embrace working across different countries and cultures, we say ‘when meeting remoteness with closeness, we can truly become one world’ -that feels very relevant at the moment and perhaps working through a crisis can bring people together and give the necessary perspective.

Any interesting projects, exhibitions or launches for later this year that you can share?

There are a number of new projects brewing in Nine United at the moment. With &Tradition we are looking forward to bringing new products to market through digital launches and hopefully also presenting them in exhibitions at our showrooms in autumn.

We’re also looking at creating a new collection and brand with a focus on the needs we have seen emerging across the market in Europe and which may become even more relevant.  

Given time to reflect, what would be your wish for a new piece of furniture or lighting? 

I’m not a 100% set on one item specifically, but the next piece of furniture or lighting, I’d be looking for has a long-lasting quality, great colour  – and perhaps some humour or a joyful expression to put a smile on people’s faces.

Please send us a photo from home of something you find inspiring. 

It’s the view from the dining table where I work from across into the living room which I find both relaxing and inspiring thanks to the creative people and good experiences the furniture and lighting reminds me of. 

Many thanks to Katherine for taking the time to talk to us as part of our Social Togetherness series.

 

Social Togetherness: Alex Mowat in Conversation

On May 16, 2020 · 0 Comments

Today we’re talking to architect Alex Mowat as part of our Social Togetherness series.

Where is home for you?

Camberwell, South London. A timber house that was built in 1970, the year I was born. I think of it as my “architectural twin”.

What are the highlights of your home working day?

Everyone in our architect’s practice joins a 9 am “sign-in” and 6 pm “sign-out” video call every day. We swop experiences about eggs, baby blankets, Eccles cakes and good songs. These small things and the routine are keeping us going.

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal place?

Whist trying to keep a regular routine, I have found the time to help the charity, Woodland Heritage. We are re-designing the sawmill at Whitney-on-wye in Herefordshire. We want to be able to increase our capacity for milling timber from Britain’s great estates for beams, boats, furniture and door handles. The mill will also extend its base for training, learning and sharing.

Are you learning a new skill?

The super-fast spread of the corona virus shows us how easy it is to spread animal and plant disease un-naturally across the world. Many people are rightly reconnecting with food and farming. For the furniture, design and construction industry it will mean a bigger focus on local materials.  With my morning coffee in a beautiful Standard Ware Mug by Leach Pottery I am reading my collection of old books on indigenous timber, learning each tree’s Latin name and their traditional uses and qualities. (Full Disclosure: not huge success on the Latin so far).

What positive change might come from Covid-19?

We might learn to value our parents and elders more in society. Their wisdom, stories and experience are the relay race baton they pass on. They tell us how to run the race when it gets hard. I am lucky to have generous and fun parents as well as many wise industry contacts and mentors in design, construction and forestry.

Interesting projects for later this year?

We are currently working on a social housing building and 12 individual homes for rent, both starting construction when the lockdown is eased. A new infill office building in the small lanes near Covent Garden, the “up-cycling” of an old institutional building in South London and a new way of using a collection of old barns in North London.

What would be your wish for a new piece of furniture or lighting?

Newness is not always something I strive for but my wish starts with:

Something grown locally, something made locally, something that will get better with age, something beautiful and strokable.

Something made by one of our great manufacturers like Ercol, Very Good and Proper, Benchmark, Gaze Burvill, Young and Norgate, Another Country or Sebastian Cox……….

Many thanks to Alex for taking the time to talk to us. Join us next week for the next instalment of Social Togetherness.

 

Social Togetherness: Eleanor Pritchard in Conversation

On May 9, 2020 · 0 Comments

Social Togetherness – twentytwentyone are honoured to work with a host of wonderfully creative designers, makers and manufacturers and today we are talking to contemporary textiles designer, Eleanor Pritchard.

Where’s home for you? 

Peter and I moved just a few months ago to a little bungalow on One Tree Hill in Honor Oak Park – South East London. It needs a lot of work but is full of quirky charm. I feel so grateful we are in such a quiet, leafy part of the city – the lockdown must be so much harder for people with no green space around them.

What are the highlights of your home-working day?

I have been really touched by the many kind and thoughtful personal messages I have had from clients all over the world in the last few weeks. It makes me realize what a strong network we have grown through our work over the years. 

The lockdown has brought a much slower pace of life for me. It shows up how frantic the schedule in the studio can be. Now even making a pot of coffee has become a ritual! 

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal pace?

I feel very lucky that our new home has a garden. When we first looked at the estate agent’s details for our place I had visions of Tom and Barbara from ‘The Good Life’… and indeed last month we dug up part of the lawn for potatoes and broad beans. We have a tiny cold frame and all my seedlings are coming up now – it feels very grounding and rewarding to watch them grow. 

Are you learning a new skill, craft or hobby?

Initially, I imagined that this particular situation would offer all sorts of creative opportunities – I kept reading articles about how this is a chance to write that unwritten novel or paint that masterpiece!! … but in reality, I find myself much too distracted for any really creative design work. What I have found though is real pleasure in using my hands to make something. I am working very slowly on a piece of drawn-thread work which will – one day – work as a curtain for our bedroom window. In many ways, the process of drawn-thread is the opposite of weaving (…perhaps a metaphor for me in these strange times! …). You start with a woven fabric and then remove sections of threads which are tied to form open lace-like effects. It is very slow to do, but that’s the joy – it’s about the process rather than the outcome. 

I have also been doing a postcard exchange with a group of friends. I am trying to draw one every day – and the pleasure of getting something real and home-made in the post is wonderful. It’s a very different way to stay in touch with people – a non-virtual, non-digital exchange. 

What positive change might come from Covid-19 for you, or your wider community, or the world at large?

I really hope I can hold onto something of the slower pace for myself. In the wider community we must show much more real recognition (in terms of wages and working conditions) to all the essential workers we all rely on every day. The pandemic has shown up the widening inequalities in this country, and we need real resolve for change. As a global society, we must also bring some of the energy and resolve which are in such evidence now to the climate crisis.

Any interesting projects, exhibitions or launches for later this year that you can share?

One project that will launch later in the year is a new blanket we have made for Fallingwater. It is called Carreg – Welsh for stone – and references the fireplace in the Guest House at Fallingwater. It is part of an ongoing project in which I have been responding to the architecture of the house through woven pattern. I have just written a post about it on our journal which you can see here.

Given time to reflect, what would be your wish for a new piece of furniture or lighting? 

I would really like a pig bench from Mick Sheridan’s ‘Welsh Vernacular’ series. They are a beautiful contemporary re-interpretation of a rustic tradition. A couple of years ago Mick used some of our Aerial fabrics for the upholstery on the Welsh Vernacular series and I have been dreaming of one ever since.

Any music or podcasts you would recommend? 

I have been listening to Max Richter’s 8 hour lullaby Sleep on radio 3 – the 2015 live recording from the reading room at the Welcome Collection. I was really sorry to miss the live ‘sleepover’ performance of this at the Barbican a couple of years ago so it has been great to be able to listen to the whole piece now. It is very mesmeric.

I have also recently finished reading ‘The Shepherd’s Life’ by James Rebanks about sheep farming in the Lake District. I really enjoyed the insights into his relationship with the landscape through shepherding – a way of life that in many ways is unchanged over the centuries. 

Please send us a photo from home of something you find inspiring. 

I find Rachel Scott’s work particularly inspiring – and now even more-so since reading ‘The Shepherd’s Life’. She spins her own yarn and makes wonderful hand-woven tapestry rugs. All the wool is undyed from British sheep breeds – the range of colours is extraordinary. We have three of her rugs at home and I really love them. There is a piece on our journal which I wrote about her work a couple of years ago here.

Many thanks to Eleanor for taking the time to talk to us.

 

 

Social Togetherness: Jacob Plejdrup in Conversation

On April 30, 2020 · 0 Comments

Today we’re talking to Jacob Plejdrup, founder of DK3 as part of our Social Togetherness series.

Where’s home for you?

Home is Denmark for me. A small safe country, where we trust in each other and where we take care of each other. Especially in these times of the Covid-19 it really shows…

What are the highlights of your home-working day?

Taking a phone-call and speaking from the terrace in the sun!

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal pace?

Spending more time – more relaxed time – in the nature – which is the most inspiring thing for me!

What positive change might come from Covid-19 for you, or your wider community, or the world at large?

That we are forced to think differently – change is inevitable. We must consume less – be thoughtful – sustainable. Travel less. And appreciate/enjoy what we already have.

Any interesting projects, exhibitions or launches for later this year that you can share?

Our international to-date most successful dining table TEN TABLE will be launched in a round, extendable version this Summer.

Please send us a photo from home of something you find inspiring.

The south-side of our garden and house. The west-wind is stopped by the huge trees in the background. It’s my favourite spot in our private “park” for some sun, peace – and reflection.

Thank you, Jacob, for taking the time to speak to us.

 

 

Social Togetherness: Koda Munetoshi in Conversation

On April 18, 2020 · 0 Comments

Social Togetherness – twentytwentyone are honoured to work with wonderfully creative designers, makers and manufacturers and today we’re talking to Koda Munetoshi, CEO, Maruni Global Branding, Japan. Where’s home for you?

Tokyo, Japan

What are the highlights of your home-working day?

Maybe, the web-meeting by Zoom with my team.

What creative pursuits are you doing now that you ordinarily wouldn’t manage if the world were at its normal pace?

Our government has just declared the state of emergency a few days ago, so for me, the world was still at normal pace for the moment. But, from next week, the situation will be changed, so I would like to spend time to write a book (compile my know-how) to establish a brand in the international market for Japanese furniture manufactures because they’re still facing difficulties to penetrate own-brand into the international market.

Are you learning a new skill, craft or hobby?

Well, I learned how difficult to make my son finish his lunch within an hour.

What positive change might come from Covid-19 for you, or your wider community, or the world at large?

Thanks to “remote-working”, now I’m spending much, much, more time with my family, compared with before. It takes an hour (from door to door) to commute to my office, so I can spend at least 2 more hours with my family every day. I think I’m spending 3-4 hours with my kids now in a day. Before the Covid-19, I even couldn’t spend 30 min with kids in a day (weekday).
This is absolutely the positive change to me. And, a lot of fathers in Japan must agree with me, I guess.

Any interesting projects, exhibitions or launches for later this year that you can share?

Well, there is some news actually, but they need to be confidential for some more weeks.

Thank you, Koda, for taking the time to speak to us.

 

twentytwentyone Christmas Wish List

On December 5, 2019 · 0 Comments

Looking for a little Christmas gift inspiration? We asked the twentytwentyone team what they would most like to find under their tree this year.

Kal Calendar 2020 – Jessy

“A minimalist calendar to make organising simple and easy. The perfect gift to myself for Christmas.”

Coco 6 bar dark chocolate – Solen

“Just like crisp packets, chocolate boxes often feel 80% empty. Not with this chocolate *bar* box! Maximum delicious density!”

Hoptimist Reindeer Bumble – Augusta

“Guaranteed to put a smile on everybody’s face. Spring yourself into the New Year!”

Fallow Wool Blanket – Craig

“Originally designed for the Bauhaus dormitories, this design classic would look great in any home and keep you warm.”

Knot Ring – Sabrina

“Beautiful and simple design, the perfect gift for someone special.”

 

 

Fraser Rucksack – Joe

“Whether sophisticated in the city or camouflaged in the country, your stuff is staying dry and you’re smug about your sustainably-sourced rucksack.”

 

Hotaru Marker Table Lamp – Simon

“The warm glow of washi paper, sitting on the floor adjacent the Christmas tree, please Santa.”

Farm Calendar 2020– Maggie

“A cute way to mark time pass with these endearing farm animal silhouettes in soft pastels.”

Lakrids Liquorice Dark – Guy

“Finest Danish Liquorice rolled in smooth dark chocolate, perfect for those dark winter nights.”

Kore Paper Flowers – Verity

“Fun, elegant and sustainable. The perfect post-Christmas dinner craft session.”

Maria Blanket – Claire

“Perfect for keeping warm on these cold winter evenings.”

Canele Candle Holder – Rosie

“A delicate holder for a single slender candle, shaped like those little rum and vanilla patisseries. A charming and sweet gift.”

Aqua Culture Vase – Victor

“Join the daily struggle to keep your house plants alive with style and minimalism.”

Huuhkaja Owl Tea Towel – Erin

“A simple but fun tea towel that matches any kitchen. Perfect for the holiday baker on your list!”

Skandinavisk Hjem Gift Set – Vanessa

“Deliciously scented candles, beautifully packaged and  made of sustainably-sourced vegetable wax!”

Setago rechargeable lamp – Manon

“This cute little mushroom-shaped lamp brings light and joy to every room!”

Oimu Incense Sticks – Charity

“The traditionally produced incense uses all-natural ingredients, smells great and is very prettily packaged”

Tate Otama soup ladle – Tony

“The simplicity of this Japanese ladle belies its thoughtfulness.”

 

Ronan Bouroullec Poster – Raphael

“I love how Ronan Bouroullec pairs bold colour with abstract yet organic forms…and makes it look so easy.”

Pauper Coin Collector – Annabel

“I love the pose and the expression on its face! Makes saving your coins all the more joyful.”

 

Solar Magnetic Brooch – Lisa

“This sun-shaped broach cleverly attaches to any garment using a magnet. It can be worn on its own, or grouped together (My personal fav).”

 

Yakumi Japanese Spice Pots – Sophie

“Such a pretty pot and the chance to grow your own Chillies and brighten up the kitchen window ledge. I would like all three please.”

Mini Nisse – Laura

“The perfect little festive addition to a growing collection!”

 

Airflow Mobile – Cliff

“Like a sycamore seed captured in swirling descent, it reminds me of autumn, which reminds me of winter, which reminds me of Christmas!”

 

Shop the twentytwenyone wish list here.

 

London Design Festival – Edit ’19

On August 28, 2019 · 0 Comments

 

twentytwentyone present a defining mix of contemporary and classic designs newly launched in 2019 for the London Design Festival.

Edit ’19 combines re-issued historical designs with present-day launches, in an intriguingly eclectic yet harmonious exhibition.

Central to the exhibition’s remit is to explore the varied use of material, process and form. Materials including wood, wool, leather, paper, cast iron and enamelled steel complement a diverse range of processes celebrating both handcrafted and machine-made techniques. An inspiring collection of aesthetics will contrast and compliment.

Work by eminent twentieth-century designers Poul Cadovius, Herbert Hirche and Paul McCobb will be relaunched alongside respected contemporary counterparts including Barber & Osgerby, Pierre Charpin, Ilse Crawford, Cecilie Manz, Jasper Morrison, Raw Edges and Shane Schneck. The work of graphic artist Philippe Weisbecker will be displayed for the first time in the UK.

Each design has been selected for its inherent quality and enduring sensibilities. If not already a design classic, twentytwentyone suggest the longevity of the new designs presented.

Edit ’19
twentytwentyone showroom
18c River Street,
London, EC1R 1XN

Private View: Tues 17th September 6.00 – 8.00pm
Exhibition runs Wednesday – Saturday 9.30 – 5.30pm, Sunday 11.00 – 5.00pm

 

 

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2019

On February 12, 2019 · 0 Comments

Last week twentytwentyone ventured to Stockholm for the annual Furniture Fair, our first design event of the year. It was a great opportunity to discover innovative design and new collections while catching up with some familiar faces.

View some of our highlights below.

 

 

twentytwentyone October Newsletter

On October 14, 2018 · 0 Comments

The latest edition of the twentytwentyone newsletter has arrived, featuring October’s new arrivals in-store and online. We introduce an exclusive new manufacturer, Gemla, Sweden’s oldest furniture factory who use traditional techniques to craft contemporary bentwood chairs.

We also have new additions to the Wallace Sewell block collection. Sumptuous throws and cushions woven in the softest merino wool with reversible designs, these new colour ways are a perfect accompaniment to cosy Autumn days spent at home.

To ensure you stay informed on all this and more, subscribe to our monthly newsletter here.

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