Summer Sale

On June 15, 2019 · 0 Comments

Our summer sale starts today with 15% off orders of furniturelighting and rugs from selected manufacturers online and in-store.

We also have reductions of up to 50% on a host of ex-display furniture, lighting and accessories. These are available to view and purchase at our River Street showroom and Upper Street shop.

Sale ends Sunday 28th July 2019.

Milan Design Week 2019

On April 24, 2019 · 0 Comments

This month the twentytwentyone team made their annual trip to Milan Design Week, attending the world-renowned Salone del Mobile, Euroluce lighting exhibition and various design events held across the city. Here the furniture and lighting industry showcase the latest in cutting-edge design, product launches and new collaborations from around the world.

Preview new works by established and break-through designers in our Milan 2019 photo report.

 

Easter Opening Hours

On April 18, 2019 · 0 Comments

Easter Opening Hours

Upper Street Shop

Good Friday        11am-5pm
Saturday             10am-6pm
Easter Sunday    Closed
Easter Monday   11am-5pm

River Street Showroom

Good Friday        Closed
Saturday             9.30am-5.30pm
Easter Sunday    Closed
Easter Monday   Closed

Normal opening hours resume Tuesday 23rd April at both locations.

Stockholm Furniture Fair 2019

On February 12, 2019 · 0 Comments

Last week twentytwentyone ventured to Stockholm for the annual Furniture Fair, our first design event of the year. It was a great opportunity to discover innovative design and new collections while catching up with some familiar faces.

View some of our highlights below.

 

 

twentytwentyone October Newsletter

On October 14, 2018 · 0 Comments

The latest edition of the twentytwentyone newsletter has arrived, featuring October’s new arrivals in-store and online. We introduce an exclusive new manufacturer, Gemla, Sweden’s oldest furniture factory who use traditional techniques to craft contemporary bentwood chairs.

We also have new additions to the Wallace Sewell block collection. Sumptuous throws and cushions woven in the softest merino wool with reversible designs, these new colour ways are a perfect accompaniment to cosy Autumn days spent at home.

To ensure you stay informed on all this and more, subscribe to our monthly newsletter here.

London Design Festival 18 – Edit ’18

On September 2, 2018 · 0 Comments

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twentytwentyone will host Edit ’18, an exhibition of innovative and enduring new designs, many of which are seen for the first time in the UK as part of the London Design Festival.

The curated edit combines newly released historical designs with contemporary launches, in an eclectic yet harmonious exhibition. Central to the exhibition’s remit is to explore the varied approaches to material, process and form. A host of materials including wood, wool, concrete, paper and steel will reflect a diverse range of techniques, handcrafted and machine-made.

Eminent twentieth-century designers Børge Mogensen, Bodil Kjær and Pierre Paulin will be relaunched alongside respected contemporary counterparts with new works by Barber Osgerby, R&E Bouroullec, Pauline Deltour, Cecilie Manz, Tiipoi, Sebastian Wrong and Jun Yasumoto.

Edit ’18
twentytwentyone showroom
18c River Street,
London, EC1R 1XN

Private View: Tues 18th September 6.30-8.30pm

Exhibition runs 19th – 23rd September.
Wednesday – Saturday 9.30 – 5.30pm, Sunday 11.00 – 5.00pm

 

Edit '18 brands

 

twentytwentyone August newsletter

On August 16, 2018 · 0 Comments

twentytwentyone-Barber-Osgerby-bellhop-brown

Our August newsletter has arrived with details of the newest arrivals online and in-store, from archive Lucienne Day designs to modern lighting from Barber & Osgerby.

Also included is a date for your diary, we’re hosting Edit ’18 as part of London Design Festival 2018.

To ensure you stay informed on all things twentytwentyone, subscribe to our monthly newsletter here.

In Conversation with Koda Munetoshi, Maruni

On July 19, 2018 · 0 Comments
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Maruni Hiroshima armchair wood in walnut designed by Naoto Fukasawa

Founded in 1928, Maruni Wood Industries embodies Japanese design. Having developed a technique of bentwood working considered extremely difficult at the time, the company has been at the forefront of pursuing industrialised craft, achieving a balance between the quality of hand craftsmanship with the benefits of mass production.

We talk to Koda Munetoshi, the CEO for Maruni Global Branding Inc, about the new additions to the Maruni collection; the Fugu and Roundish chairs, celebrating Maruni’s 90th anniversary and a very special project in California.

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Koda Munetoshi, the CEO for Maruni Global Branding Inc

What is your role at Maruni?

Right now I’m CEO of Maruni’s subsidiary for International Sales Business. Basically, I’m in charge of all of the European market, but I’m also running the company! [Laughs] So I’m doing so many things!

We know Maruni has key dealers all over the world, so you must be incredibly busy. Have you any idea of how many thousand miles you travel each year?

I spend one-third of the year travelling outside of Japan! I love to travel, especially in the UK and North America. I speak English, so it’s easy for me to stay in these places because there’s no language barrier. I love Paris and Milan too.

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The Roundish armchair designed by Naoto Fukasawa

What are the technical difficulties with the new Roundish chair?

Usually, when a manufacturer produces this kind of light plywood chair, two pieces of plywood are used for each side of the seat. These are then glued in the middle. Naoto Fukasawa saw this joining line as a sort of ‘noise’, an unnecessary detail. So we needed to wrap single sheets of ply into the 3-dimensional shape of the curved seat. To do this and get a smooth curve is not easy and required us to stretch the individual plies before wrapping them into the seat shape.

Another challenge was how to deal with the waste ply that this shape would create at the back of the seat. Naoto decided to make a hole at the back of the chair, from where the waste could easily be cut away.

How long was its development, from initial design to production in the factory?

It took us a whole two years.

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The Fugu chair designed by Jasper Morrison

Why is the Fugu chair called Fugu?

Fugu is a Japanese word that means ‘Blowfish’. The shape reminded Jasper of a blowfish [Laughs]. Honestly speaking, the Maruni factory is located in Hiroshima, which is one of the best places to have Fugu in Japan. Every winter Jasper and Naoto visit Hiroshima to see production at the factory, which is also the best season to eat Fugu, so we take the designers to a super good Fugu restaurant when they visit. Maybe this is why Jasper named it this! [Laughs]

Where does the oak come from?

We source all the wood from outside of Japan. This is because Japanese wood is not certified as sustainable. So we use certified oak and walnut from the United States, and Beech and Ash from Germany.

Naoto and Jasper seem to have a similar approach to their work, with quite timeless and minimal designs that resonate well with Maruni’s approach to manufacturing. Are the designers very alike?

Basically, their development process is similar, but their approach is different. Naoto’s approach is more academic. He has a specific logic in his mind, and all of the lines, angles, degrees, are always more specific. Jasper has this too, but it seems like the sense of something is more important for Jasper. Even though he has great academic knowledge about design, he is slightly more hands-on. He knows about the international market, too, which helps.

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Hiroshima armchair in beech designed by Naoto Fukasawa

On the subject of Maruni’s international market, thousands of Hiroshima chairs were specified for a very special new office in California – Apple Park. Why do you think that Japanese design is very much at the forefront of furniture design now?

It is difficult to know why, and it doesn’t mean that Japanese products are doing well on the international market all the time. The most important thing for Naoto and Jasper is that the products are useful, and practical. The design could be very beautiful, or the process could be very intricate, but if it’s not comfortable it doesn’t work.

When we pursue the ultimate practicality of a product, then with it will come the highest level of beauty. That’s why we’re always trying to make and pursue only the most useful designs.

90th Anniversary limited edition Hiroshima armchair and T-O chair. Only 90 of each chair will be produced worldwide.

Maruni celebrated its 90th anniversary in April of this year – congratulations! How has the company changed over the years, and what does the future hold?

Some people say Maruni is the first and sole international furniture manufacturer in Japan. Each year at the Salon de Mobile in Milan, we display in hall 16, which is definitely the best location on this huge exhibition site. There are no Japanese furniture brands that have displayed in that position in history, and it makes us proud. We would like to maintain this reputation as Japan’s best furniture maker and would like to improve our manufacturing techniques more and more.

Most importantly, we want to continue to represent Japanese craftsmanship and aesthetic sense. Japanese manufacturers are so neat, meticulous, sometimes stubborn, even [laughs]. But that’s the character of our country and our nationality. This characteristic is of value to people from outside of Japan. We would like to continue conveying this message to our customers through our products.

Many thanks to Koda Munetoshi for taking the time to talk to us.  Maruni products are available online and in-store at our shop and showroom. 

An enduring classic: the Royal System

On August 4, 2015 · 0 Comments

Storage is a perennial problem in most households, so any shelving system that combines adaptability, flexibility and efficiency with sheer good looks is sure to stand the test of time.

The dk3 Royal System is just such a product. It was designed in 1948 as the world’s first wall-hung furniture system, immediately establishing itself as an exemplary twentieth century shelving system and a landmark in Danish design – and it remains as popular as ever in the present day.

An enduring design classic: the Royal System

Celebrated Danish designer Poul Cadovius developed the original concept for the Royal System in 1948 as a means of freeing up valuable floor space from ever-increasing clutter.

As Cadovius observed, ‘Most of us live on the bottom of a cube. If we were to use the walls in the same way we use the floor, we would get more space to live in.’

Designed in 1948 and still in production: the Royal System

Cadovius’s pioneering design was an international success, thanks to its pared back elegance and peerless adaptability.

This modular system of handsome shelves, cupboards and work station units could be configured to suit each unique living environment – and then extended or reconfigured as required to accommodate changes in use.

The Royal System is infinitely adaptable

Now relaunched by Danish manufacturers dk3, the Royal System is made to the same exacting standards that ensured its initial success.

In addition to its classic Scandinavian styling and its flexibility, the Royal System is distinguished by its ease of installation.

twentytwentyone is proud to be a stockist of an enduring classic of modern design and a product that has brought order, efficiency and visual delight to countless living and working spaces over the decades.

Detail of the Royal System work station module

 

icons of modern design currently on sale at twentytwentyone

On July 3, 2015 · 0 Comments

twentytwentyone’s summer contemporary furniture sale includes some of the most iconic examples of modern designer furniture, now available with significant discounts.

Royal System shelving

The Royal System is widely recognised both as a benchmark in twentieth century wall shelving design and as an exemplar of midcentury Danish design. Designed in 1948 by Poul Cadovius and recently relaunched by DK3, it consists of a set of standard shelves and desk, drawer and cupboard units which can be combined to create a personalised storage system.

In addition to its typically streamlined Scandinavian styling, the beauty of the Royal System is that it can be reconfigured or extended with ease to adapt to changes in use. It is exclusively available from twentytwentyone and is currently discounted by 15% in the furniture sale.

Dining Table One by Another Country

Another Country is a relatively young design firm but their products are already being heralded as classics of contemporary design. Inspired by both the British and Scandinavian traditions of woodworking, Dining Table One is a refined yet sturdy centrepiece in solid oak, crafted in Europe and currently 15% off in our designer furniture sale.

CH 24 chair by Hans Wegner

The CH 24 is the first chair that Hans Wegner designed for esteemed Danish manufacturers Carl Hansen & Son. Also known as ‘the Wishbone Chair’ on account of its elegantly shaped Y-back, the CH 24‘s gracious curves and enduring appeal have ensured its place in the canon of modern chair design.

This chair is now 15% off in the modern furniture sale. Several one-off, ex-display models of this chair are also in our clearance furniture sale, discounted by 25%: view here.

DSW chair by Charles & Ray Eames

Equally iconic, though very different, is the DSW Side Chair designed by Charles and Ray Eames. The original fibreglass version of 1950 was the first industrially manufactured plastic chair; today the DSW Side Chair is licensed to Vitra and is produced in polypropalene.

Immensely popular and much-imitated, this is perhaps the archetype of the modern chair; it is certainly one of the most readily recognisable examples of twentieth-century furniture design. Now available in a range of colours at 15% off in our furniture sale.

Reflect sideboard by Muuto

The Reflect sideboard, designed by Soren Rose for Danish manufacturer Muuto, is a thoroughly contemporary addition to the classic tradition of Scandinavian design.

The oak unit’s cupboard and drawer fronts have a subtle concave curvature that is enhanced by the play of light, lending an up-to-date twist to an exemplary piece of Danish design which is already a modern classic. Now 15% off in our furniture sale.

Tulip table by Eero Saarinen for Knoll

Eero Saarinen‘s Tulip table for Knoll is another classic of modern furniture design, with a refinement and purity of form that clearly speak of Saarinen’s early training as a sculptor.

Designed in 1957, this is a genuinely timeless piece that sits with ease and integrity in any variety of settings. Available as a coffee table or dining table in a variety of finishes, now reduced by 15% in our furniture sale.

The Penguin Donkey, designed by Egon Riss and manufactured by Isokon PlusThe Penguin Donkey was designed in 1939 by Egon Riss to hold Penguin paperbacks as well as magazines, newspapers and other books. Despite its slightly comical name, this small storage unit has a distinguished pedigree that links it to some of the stellar names in modern design.

It was manufactured by Isokon, the modernist British architectural and design practice established by Jack Pritchard that also employed Bauhaus luminaries Walter Gropius and Marcel Breuer. Now reissued by Isokon Plus, the Penguin Donkey stands as an icon of modernism in its own right. It is now reduced by 15% in our designer furniture sale.

View twentytwentyone’s furniture sale here.

View one-off, ex-display clearance furniture sale here.

The twentytwentyone sale ends on 31 July.

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